Snake River Brewers - A Homebrew Club Serving Boise, Nampa, and the Treasure Valley of Idaho
Snake River Brewers
A Homebrewing Club Serving Boise, Nampa, and the Treasure Valley of Idaho.
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Author Topic: primary to secondary to keg for aging  (Read 6963 times)
O.P.P.
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« on: November 05, 2010, 12:03:03 PM »

I racked a scotch ale batch into a corny keg yesterday for longer-term aging in the fridge yesterday. It's fully fermented, and I put a tad of head pressure on it after venting out the oxygen - but I'm having second thoughts all the sudden. Did I do this right? I'd like to cold-age it for at least another month before carbonating.

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Bob_Boblaw
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« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2010, 12:10:30 PM »

Sounds ok to me. You're basically using the keg as your secondary. In a month or so, you could rack into another keg and carb. from that point. Or just leave it there. Your choice. Cold crashing right now will clear the beer very well.
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« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2010, 12:11:15 PM »

Did I do this right?
Ya - it should be fine as long as the keg seals good.  Beer Toast
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scrubby
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« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2010, 12:46:25 PM »

That is how I do it if I am going to lager or age a beer. I usually will just carb it up in that same keg.
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psykobillys
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« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2010, 12:53:47 PM »

That is how I do it if I am going to lager or age a beer. I usually will just carb it up in that same keg.
+1

no worries. that's how i usually do it. you could even just throw the keg in the garage or other "cool" place for the next month or so to "condition" if you prefer not to lager it.
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« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2010, 01:24:58 PM »

That is how I do it if I am going to lager or age a beer. I usually will just carb it up in that same keg.
+2 I do the same thing on all my lagers after I rack off the primary yeast cake. I will also do this to ales that I leave in the primary for 3 weeks - just skip the secondary and keg. I could then rack to another keg for serving/carbing, but I'm lazy and just sacrifice the first pour that contains the remaining sediment.
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dale
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« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2010, 03:40:09 PM »

That is how I do it if I am going to lager or age a beer. I usually will just carb it up in that same keg.
+2 I do the same thing on all my lagers after I rack off the primary yeast cake. I will also do this to ales that I leave in the primary for 3 weeks - just skip the secondary and keg. I could then rack to another keg for serving/carbing, but I'm lazy and just sacrifice the first pour that contains the remaining sediment.

I rack to another keg for serving.  Moving the keg to the kegerator causes the sediment to be disturbed, clouding the beer again.  I rack directly from the fridge without moving the keg, and it does makes for a clearer beer.
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psykobillys
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« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2010, 05:16:22 PM »

I rack to another keg for serving.  Moving the keg to the kegerator causes the sediment to be disturbed, clouding the beer again.
I guess I'm just more careful. Grin
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« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2010, 05:48:04 PM »

I rack to another keg for serving.  Moving the keg to the kegerator causes the sediment to be disturbed, clouding the beer again.
I guess I'm just more careful. Grin


My lager fridge is the extra room in my kegerator. No moving, just pop on the lines.
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« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2010, 11:20:20 PM »

::phew:: okay, sweet. it's already in the fridge and before today, I didn't have another keg to rack to before today (thanks Rob!)

when I tasted the hydrometer sample it def seemed to need to be aged, even though the recipe didn't really call for it. Thanks all.
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« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2010, 04:20:24 AM »

Awesome, sounds like it's going to be tasty!

So would folks say that if you carbed it now, it would hurt the aging process? I keep thinking that putting that much pressure onto the beer somehow wouldn't let it move around as it needs to and all the magic that happens during aging would slooowww down so much that you may as well not carb it up. Not that you're looking to do that, I'm just curious and think it would be neat to carb a beer and taste it over time rather than leave it there with what pressure it already has, then someday carb it to drink it. Does this make sense?
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« Reply #11 on: November 06, 2010, 06:45:23 AM »

Troy, you mentioned to me using a carb stone.
Besides speeding up carbonation, what are you hoping to gain? I don't know of anyone that has used one in their keg.

You can't really lager with pressure, the yeast will shut down drop out of suspension faster and you wouldn't get the absorption of diacytyl and other things I can't spell, right?
It still conditions and the beer will change under pressure, the last pint is usually perfect.
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« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2010, 06:51:19 AM »

Troy, you mentioned to me using a carb stone.
Besides speeding up carbonation, what are you hoping to gain? I don't know of anyone that has used one in their keg.

You can't really lager with pressure, the yeast will shut down drop out of suspension faster and you wouldn't get the absorption of diacytyl and other things I can't spell, right?
It still conditions and the beer will change under pressure, the last pint is usually perfect.

Thanks Rob, so basically if you're still fermenting don't force carb, though when it's done and you're conditioning carbing it is fine and make sure to enjoy the last pint Tongue
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« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2010, 07:39:50 AM »

Troy, you mentioned to me using a carb stone.
Besides speeding up carbonation, what are you hoping to gain? I don't know of anyone that has used one in their keg.

You can't really lager with pressure, the yeast will shut down drop out of suspension faster and you wouldn't get the absorption of diacytyl and other things I can't spell, right?
It still conditions and the beer will change under pressure, the last pint is usually perfect.

Thanks Rob, so basically if you're still fermenting don't force carb, though when it's done and you're conditioning carbing it is fine and make sure to enjoy the last pint Tongue
yeast do far more than ferment (that is if you mean the conversion of sugars to alcohol and CO2). they play a particularly important role in cool/cold conditioning, removing/neutralizing/metabolizing compounds that can come across as "off-flavors," which is why the last pint is the best.  Wink
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"Give a man a beer and he'll waste an afternoon. Teach a man to brew and he'll waste a lifetime."
-Old Psyko Proverb

I couldn't log into my iPad...then I realized that it was an etch-a-sketch and that I don't have an iPad... Also, I'm out of vodka...
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« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2010, 10:37:45 PM »

yeah, I had thought about a carb stone since I was going to be buying a new keg lid anyway... drop the extra cash and get one of those fancy lids with the dip tube and carb stone built in - but after reading more about it (and balancing my checkbook) it didn't happen. My thought was that it just seemed like a more efficient way to force carbonate, but isn't really necessary.

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